Preschool Health

Chicken pox, also called varicella, is a common childhood illness and one that may well affect your toddler. It typically appears as an itchy rash of small red bumps that are seen on the scalp, face, or trunk.

Chicken pox
Chicken pox, also called varicella, is a common childhood illness and one that may well affect your toddler. It typically appears as an itchy rash of small red bumps that are seen on the scalp, face, or trunk. These quickly change into blisters filled with a clear fluid which then burst leaving dry brown crusts. Waves of these blisters will appear as the chicken pox progresses and the condition will be seen over their entire body. Chicken pox usually lasts five to ten days and may be accompanied by a fever,
headache or abdominal pain. Your toddler may also be irritable and have a loss of appetite. For a couple of days before the rash appears, they may have a cough or a runny nose.

Body Temperature and Fever
It is generally accepted by medical professionals that the normal body temperature for a healthy child is between 97 and 100.4 degrees Fahrenheit (36 to 38 degrees Celsius). When a child’s temperature goes above this range, they have a fever. In children under five, the parameters are slightly different and a fever in a youngster of this age is considered to be a temperature over 37.5C (99.5F).

Diarrhoea
It can be quite distressing for both you and your child when your child has diarrhoea, as episodes of incontinence can cause both embarrassment and fear for your little one. Diarrhoea can either be acute, which means that it has a sudden onset and a short duration (less than two weeks) or it can be chronic, which means that it is long-term and persistent. Fortunately, most cases of childhood diarrhoea are of the acute form and usually last only a few days